Ask the experts

Here is a selection of Q&As from Your Surrey Wedding magazine. If you would like your question answered by our experts, please email it to editor@yoursurrey.wedding.

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Hot topic: Blush colour palettes

Our experts answer your questions

Fashion

Fashion

Q. I love the blush colour palette but think it's been over done this year. How can I still incorporate my favourite hue with a new twist?

A. Julie Aitken says: We love the blush tones too! A great way of incorporating them is to mixand- match with other colours from a similar palette such as lovely soft metallic golds, and other vintage hues, this will then create a beautiful delicate hint of your favourite colour, and offer some lovely interest.

Styling

Styling

Q. I love the blush colour palette but think it's been over done this year. How can I still incorporate my favourite hue with a new twist?

A. Annabel Grange says: The blush pink colour palette is very popular at the moment – but what if you want to add something a bit different?

Why not opt for a wonderful cascading bouquet full of beautiful blush pink roses and some soft flowing greenery, but then with the addition of sprays of diamantés and crystals. The bouquet can be used on the cake table after the ceremony.

Instead of jam jars on a wood slice or galvanised jugs, use a tall glass vases, Martini Vases, or even candelabra, with wonderful large blooms such as roses, hydrangeas, gladioli, allium and Anthurrihum to give a real wow factor! Crystal strings or crystal teardrops added to the displays or hanging from the vases add a new twist.

Add a table runner – but not in blush pink – try silver or a luxurious lace or satin to add texture and colour. A mirror plate rather than a wood slice, with tealights in frosted holders with sparkling crystals scattered on the table and mirror.

A fairylight backdrop will add a more chic feel, behind the top table or behind the DJ – I would add some drapes of silver and a hint of the blush pink. Rather than the traditional country long top table/ceremony flowers – short square mirror vases set with large blush roses, white hydrangeas and freesias with silver and crystals added. Adding large swags of satin material to dress the front rather than greenery.

If it is a barn location think about adding fresh flower garlands or greenery, but with fairylights added on beams or upright posts. Rather than candles and lanterns use uplighters or spotlights around the room, and outside to light up trees and interesting features.

Chair covers with either a blush sash or a Chivali chair with a hood and ruffle, or for that added sparkle go for a silver satin sash!

Grooms

Grooms

Q. I love the blush colour palette but think it's been over done this year. How can I still incorporate my favourite hue with a new twist?

A. Danielle Harvey says: Ahh blush! I adored this colour teamed with rose gold before it became on-trend. But yes, it has been over done in 2017 and 2018. So moving forward, how can we still incorporate this soft romantic hue in to weddings without following the crowd? The key: colour palettes. Team this tone with something modern and up and coming such as khaki green which will also be a nod to the ever-popular succulent trend.

Black tie dos are back, blush works brilliant with dark tones including the trendy navy colour palettes.

All of these can be reflected in the groom's and groomsmen's attire as a subtle nod to your chosen colour scheme.

Make-up

Make-up

Q. I love the blush colour palette but think it's been over done this year. How can I still incorporate my favourite hue with a new twist?

A. Amy Lacey says: The blush hue colour palette has to be my favourite. You can see it throughout my home, wardrobe and in the make-up that I wear daily. I don't think it will ever date however, there are alternative twists within your make-up that you can implement if you are getting just a little bit bored of it.

MAC do a beautiful item called Paintpots. There's a lovely shimmery shade called Vintage which I use everyday. It's like a dirty peach.

Incorporate these with some lovely gold, warm colours, they would look amazing going into autumn wedding season.

Complement these with MAC pigments in shades Melon and Tan for a dramatic sunset look.
Alternatively you can just add a dash of shimmer on your cheekbones with Bobbi Brown shimmer bricks. These are so versatile. You can use them on your face, eyes and you can even dab one of the five palette hues onto lips with some simple gloss. Pink quartz and Nectar are my two staple favourites and there's currently an amazing trio palette out too. Every girl has to have this – it's beautiful!

Cakes

Cakes

Q. I love the blush colour palette but think it's been over done this year. How can I still incorporate my favourite hue with a new twist?

A. Eleanor Gerrish says: The blush palette continues to hold strong as it brings such a romantic, feminine feel and is so versatile. Adding an accent of blush to a mostly white cake design links to the theme of your general wedding décor.

Having a touch of this hue with a feature tier, or through the flowers, softens the feel. Blush pairs fabulously with metallics, greys and greens for a contemporary edge.

With this year's UltraViolet Pantone Colour of the Year some designs are including pops of deeper, more intense colours. For example, blush pinks and creams punctuated with deep red hues to add warmth and depth. Pairing this with more loose and wild floral designs enhances the modern feel of the cake design.

Watercolour brushstrokes of blush hues on white sugarpaste creates a fabulous backdrop to your design. Distressed gold or silver leaf, and feature sugar flowers, finishes the look. Edible glitter on blush sugarpaste brings a gorgeous sparkle to your design. Touches of blush in a buttercream-textured design is great for a relaxed vibe.

If you love the idea of marbled fondant, consider your favourite hue with a hint of peach and perhaps paint-strokes of metallics to accentuate the pattern.

Use of geometric design on a blush-coloured background is also a hot trend currently; gold seams for a Kintsukuroi-inspired design, the Japanese art of repairing broken items with laquer mixed with powered gold or silver.

The Mercure Box Hill Burford Bridge Hotel
Hartsfield Manor
Aurum Designer-Jewellers
Terry Fox Design